Goldin ready to test market

6 min read
Having retained and raced the progeny from their foundation stallion, Akeed Mofeed, Goldin Farms are now ready to test the market. TDN AusNZ caught up with General Manager Andrew Perryman.

Having retained and raced the early crops they bred from their foundation stallion Akeed Mofeed (GB), Goldin Farms are ready to offer up to 40 of his yearlings during the upcoming sales season.

Having taken ownership of Lindsay Park Stud in 2013, and established a new brand for the historic property, businessman Pan Sutong stood his Hong Kong champion on the 2000-acre farm at Angaston in the Barossa Valley.

But working with General Manager Andrew Perryman, Mr Pan's strategy was to ensure that Akeed Mofeed got the right support from the right mares from the outset.

Goldin Farms spent $6 million buying 28 broodmares at the sales in 2014 and 2015, sending all of them to their stallion, who was a Hong Derby and Hong Kong Cup winner.

"It's an expensive process, not too many can do it," Perryman told TDN AusNZ. "But Mr Pan is so passionate about the stallion that he was willing to put some money into it. He is committed to him."

The next part of the strategy was to ensure those first crops were given every chance to develop and become ambassadors for their sire. Perryman and Pan decided the best way to do that was to retain and race their own.

"Early days, it is quite hard to build a profile for a horse who hasn’t raced in Australia," Perryman said. "In terms of trying to stand him commercially, we had very limited outside support in his first season."

"It's an expensive process, not too many can do it, but Mr Pan is so passionate about the stallion that he was willing to put some money into it. He is committed to him." - Andrew Perryman

"We felt that was going to be the case at the sales as well. We probably wouldn’t end up with them at the top trainers. That was a bit of a worry for me. I made the suggestion that we should race them and keep them with the decent trainers, as least they get the chance."

Goldin Farm

Flying the white and gold

And so that strategy has evolved with Akeed Mofeed's first crop representing Golden in the white and gold colours for trainers such as Phillip Stokes, David and Ben Hayes and Tom Dabernig and Team Hawkes.

"We try and give them every opportunity. They have gone off to the most successful trainers. We want to ensure that aspect of it is not an issue and we want to give them every chance to succeed."

"If they don’t have the ability, then we are comfortable we have given them every chance."

Akeed Mofeed

The stallion's first stakes-winner could be crowned as soon as this Saturday with Assertive Play running in the G3 Thoroughbred Club S. at Caulfield.

Perryman said the filly, who is trained by Stokes, has shown no ill effects from her last start at Caulfield when she was eased up late in the race by jockey Craig Williams.

"We try and give them every opportunity. They have gone off to the most successful trainers. We want to ensure that aspect of it is not an issue and we want to give them every chance to succeed." - Andrew Perryman

"It was a bit of worry after last start, when she cast her leg and they took her off to the hospital, but the scintigraphy came back clean. We're hopeful. She's had a gallop there earlier in the week and Williams is happy with her," he said.

Among the others from Akeed Mofeed's first crop who are looking to impress are recent Moonee Valley winner Sunset Crop and Burning the Clock, who will contest a Ballarat maiden on Friday. Burning the Clock is out of Bel Mer, who Goldin paid $850,000 for in 2014.

Assertive Play winning at Morphettville

Testing the marketplace

Having had some success, the next stage for Goldin Farms is to start testing the stallion's appeal in the marketplace.

"We're getting a score on the board with a few of his progeny winning, so we can take a few to the sales this year," Perryman said.

"We are getting the Inglis and Magic Millions people through. We feel they are a bit more marketable now, he's got some runners and he's got some pretty good stats. He's getting plenty of winners." - Andrew Perryman

"We are getting the Inglis and Magic Millions people through. We feel they are a bit more marketable now, he's got some runners and he's got some pretty good stats. He's getting plenty of winners."

"We've got 40 (yearlings) here and we just have to work out where we go with them. We are just working that through with the sales companies. I think there will be a dozen going through Premier, and probably the same or even more through Adelaide," he said.

Perryman acknowledges that the challenge of executing the next stage of the strategy is ensuring they have the right people in place to ensure the yearlings are prepared for the best result at the sales. That could mean spreading the load across several sales across the season.

Improving the pedigree page

One of those 40 Akeed Mofeed yearlings possibly on offer will be the half-brother to Amphitrite (Sebring), who is one of the main chances in Saturday's G1 Thousand Guineas.

That filly was bred by Goldin, after they bought her dam, Ocean Dream (Redoute's Choice), in foal to Sebring for $190,000 back in 2015.

Amphitrite winning the G2 Edward Manifold S.

"She was a nice enough filly, a bit immature," Perryman said, "She went through the Adelaide sales, made 50k for (Darren) Weir. I liked her but we had to sell her and the Aussie Crawl by Sebring (Behave - Assertive Play's older half sister) who topped the Adelaide sales that year as well, which Mick Kent bought."

"We've got a yearling colt, he'll probably go to Adelaide or Melbourne sales and there's a (2YO) filly who is being broken in at the moment. The filly is probably is the standout of the two, she's a better type than Amphitrite at the same age," he said.

Perryman said there is a strong sense that the market is ready to embrace Akeed Mofeed.

"We're confident there will be more of a marketplace for them now. He's got a lot more exposure and hopefully they can sell reasonably well. We want to get them to other people's stables and they can have some success with them," he said.